Gold and Precious Metals

The silver lining of a playground in ashes

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Cynthia Gentry

Credit: contributed

Cynthia Gentry

Credit: contributed

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Cynthia Gentry

Credit: contributed

Credit: contributed

I’m not sure if it was official or not, but the treehouse was called “Summer’s Treehouse.” You see, during the time between the kids’ dreams and the build, my stepdaughter Summer lost her battle with cancer at the age of 16. One day a little girl named Isabelle from across the street knocked on our door and handed us a sandwich baggie with $26.13 in it. A strip of masking tape labeled the bag “For Summer’s Treehouse.” Isabelle had made little bracelets and sold them to raise money to donate in memory of her “big sister” friend. It was heartwarming for our broken hearts.

In the years that followed, the treehouse and playground at Chastain Park have brought immense joy to countless children. There is significant evidence that play helps mitigate the effects of trauma of all kinds in children and is not in any way a frivolous waste of children’s time. Far from it, play is essential to children’s healthy development. But to the kids it was just a great time.

That brings me to the situation we are in now and the potential gift this senseless act of destruction could bring. It is important to realize that for every “What is the matter with people?” on my Facebook and Instagram feeds there are two, “Let’s rebuild! I’ll help!” Unlike in Buffalo, we can rebuild what was lost on Saturday. We can build a new treehouse even more magnificent than the one destroyed for some unknown reason. That is the silver lining here. And, after all, in Atlanta we have quite the history of rebuilding after fires.

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Summer’s Treehouse being destroyed by fire last week.

Credit: contributed

Summer's Treehouse being destroyed by fire last week.

Credit: contributed

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Summer’s Treehouse being destroyed by fire last week.

Credit: contributed

Credit: contributed

Imagine the example that would be set for the thousands of children who visited Summer’s Treehouse every year, if in the face of total destruction, they see a community come together to build it back. Imagine how these children would later respond to life’s inevitable losses if in their formative years they see resilience in action, and it becomes part of their DNA. The children who are now devastated and confused can be empowered as they help create the vision of a new treehouse even more fun than the last one.

No matter what our age, the past years have been traumatic for most of us politically, physically, socially, emotionally, and spiritually. So, it was heartening to learn that the Chastain Park Conservancy decided in less than 24 hours to rise up from the ashes of this senseless loss and rebuild Summer’s Treehouse. What a great way to show the kids affected by this fire a healthy and powerful way to respond to difficult circumstances. It’s a win – win – win, is it not?

I just got a message from my 11-year-old grandson who knows his Aunt Summer’s treehouse well. He wants to know how to send some money to help rebuild the treehouse.

Perhaps the silver lining of this awful event is a chance to see how important it is to turn “What’s the matter with people?” into “Can I help?” Maybe together we can all change the world a little, by doing what the kids want us to do…rebuild.

Now, it’s up to us to show them it is possible and get it done.

Cynthia Gentry grew up in Atlanta and is the founder of Living Playgrounds, where she designs natural playspaces.

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